Dialogue in Chad: “We have long been waiting for this opportunity” Reviewed by Momizat on . N’Djamena, 22 March 2014 This day of dialogue with victims of crimes within the jurisdiction of the Extraordinary African Chambers (EAC) is the first day in a s N’Djamena, 22 March 2014 This day of dialogue with victims of crimes within the jurisdiction of the Extraordinary African Chambers (EAC) is the first day in a s Rating: 0

Dialogue in Chad: “We have long been waiting for this opportunity”

Cet article est également disponible en : French, Arabic

Dialogue avec des victimes : « Depuis longtemps, nous attendions cette occasion »

N’Djamena, 22 March 2014

This day of dialogue with victims of crimes within the jurisdiction of the Extraordinary African Chambers (EAC) is the first day in a series of 100, which are part of outreach activities planned for N’Djamena and inland. These meetings will take place throughout the proceedings to hear questions and concerns for presenting to the EAC.

“We have long been waiting for this opportunity,” exclaimed one victim of torture committed by the DDS, the political police in operation from 1982 to 1990 in Chad. This day of dialogue, held in the capital N’Djamena, was an opportunity for a rich encounter between the victims and their representatives and members of the outreach Consortium. A highly anticipated opportunity to give voice to concerns and pose questions.

The day of dialogue was facilitated by four experts. The Attorney General of the EAC, Mbacké Fall was invited – late in the day – as a public prosecutor. Also among the experts was a Chadian psychologist, Frederick Mackodte. His role has been to support participants, if needed, in order to guide them in the personal attitudes they should adopt pending a possible trial, to manage their expectations, and to cope with the distance, emotions, and possible disappointments.

One woman reported receiving anonymous phone calls from Dakar, late at night. She was scared and wondered what to do. “Your fear is normal,” the psychologist told her, “because it carries the trauma and makes you relive the hard times. Sharing the content of these calls frees you, but above all it is important for you to keep the courage to hope that one day justice will be served.” The Attorney General of the EAC noted the phone numbers and explained the procedure for prosecuting the perpetrators of such calls.

 “The investigation is not over, it is still possible to complain”

“The investigation is not yet complete,” said Gilbert Maoundonodji. “Victims who have not yet filed a complaint may do so by letter sent to the attorney or through victims’ lawyers.” Hugo Jombwe, expert in international law, explained that the Judges of the EAC had already come to Chad three times in order to conduct their investigations. He explained that “The CAE are at work. And not until the end of the investigation will they decide whether the accused will be tried or not. If victims do not agree on the crimes for which the defendants will be prosecuted, they can put the issue before the criminal court, and sue for other crimes. During the trial, those who were called as witnesses during the investigation may be recalled, this time to testify in court.”

In the course of the day, many questions were asked about compensation, a possible timetable for the trial of the perpetrators, the possibilities for those who have not yet filed a complaint, on the constitution of the Chadian state as a civil party, and those suspects arrested in Chad parallel to EAC procedures, some of which have since been released by the Chadian Ministry of Justice… those questions to which no answer could be found were recorded and forwarded to the EAC.

By the end of the day, after answering a few questions from the audience, the prosecutor Mbacké Fall invited participants to take heart, hoping, that the trial will take place in the near future. He spared a thought for the deceased and wished “health and long life to the survivors so that they may participate in the trial.” The prosecutor pointed out that the trial will be televised live and widely broadcast. The purpose of the EAC is to “combat impunity and injustice”, he concluded.

The Consortium

Site by Primum Africa Consulting © Copyright 2014, All Rights Reserved

Scroll to top